Basquiat at The Broad

I have always appreciated the work of Jean-Michel Basquiat. In fact, I wrote my undergrad art history thesis about the public perception of his racial identity to his work. At The Broad, it was inspiring to see Basquiat’s work in a dedicated section. Must-see section of their permanent collection gallery!

Advertisements

WILLIAM POPE.L: TRINKET

One of the most stunning exhibitions I have ever seen, the William Pope. L: Trinket exhibition at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA (March 20–June 28, 2015) was a truly immersive experience.

One quote to mention from the website by William Pope. L:

“This project is a chance for people to feel the flag,” Pope.L has said. “People need to feel their democracy,not just hear words about it. For me, democracy is active, not passive. With Trinket, I am showing something that’s always been true. The American flag is not a toy. It’s not tame. It’s bright, loud, bristling and alive.”

Photos from my visit below:

105

William Pope. L: Trinket 2008/2015, photo by Erin K. Hylton.

100

William Pope. L: Trinket 2008/2015, photo by Erin K. Hylton.

098

William Pope. L: Trinket 2008/2015, photo by Erin K. Hylton.

097

William Pope. L: Trinket 2008/2015, photo by Erin K. Hylton.

102

Installation shot of William Pope. L: Polis or the Garden or Human Nature in Action 2008/2015, photo by Erin K. Hylton 2015.

104

William Pope. L: Trinket 2008/2015, photo by Erin K. Hylton.

103

William Pope. L: Trinket 2008/2015, photo by Erin K. Hylton.

 

Manifest Justice – Los Angeles

Displaying IMG_3226.JPG

Communities around the the World are filled with good people living in fear. Enough is enough. We demand more empathy, more accountability, more opportunity, more compassion, more dignity, more power and more opportunity for all. We demand healthier communities, which means more from each other. The time has come to illuminate our resilience and to take back our communities and our hope. Together we must lift our voices, assert our power, be resilient, identify solutions and work together to MANIFEST:JUSTICE. Together we will build a more just future.

Art For Amnesty (A Program of Amnesty International) is partnering with The California Endowment through it’s Sons and Brothers initiative to bring you a 10 Day Pop- Up Art Exhibit in Los Angeles beginning May 1st and ending on May 10th. Manifest Justice is a cultural convening, a community organizing event, as well as an artivist gathering of ideas and art to further support Human Rights and Social Justice. The website is www.manifestjustice.org and we are launching the event with a online Art Submission contest to have a chance to have your art displayed alongside all of our participating artists (http://www.manifestjustice.org/about) and Judged by John Legend, Shepard Fairey, Jeff Chang, Ann Burroughs, Dr. Robert Ross, Franklin Sirmans, and Russell Simmons. (http://www.manifestjustice.org/contest)
The Contest runs through April 17th so submit as well as participate in the exhibit May 1-10th.

 

Displaying IMG_3229.JPG

Volta NY 2015

This past week was a huge and insanely busy weekend in the art world. One of my favorite stops was at Volta NY 2015 and wanted to share some of what I saw in the booths:

20150306_192901 (2)

Rudy Shepherd “Portraits” 2007-2015 Watercolor on paper Each 12 x 9 Mixed Greens, New York. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_200249 (2)

Dustin Yellin Glass, acrylic and collage Richard Heller Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_200507 (2)

Dustin Yellin Glass, acrylic and collage Richard Heller Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_200501 (2)

Dustin Yellin. detal. Glass, acrylic and collage Richard Heller Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_200243 (2)

Dustin Yellin Glass, acrylic and collage Richard Heller Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_200146 (2)

Travis Somerville “Well Division” 2009 Acrylic on vintage porcelain drinking fountains and panels, automotive paint on metal drinking fountain, copper pipes, running water Beta Pictoris/Maus Contemporary, Birmingham, Alabama. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_195945 (2)

Detail of the Black water fountain from: Travis Somerville “Well Division” 2009 Acrylic on vintage porcelain drinking fountains and panels, automotive paint on metal drinking fountain, copper pipes, running water Beta Pictoris/Maus Contemporary, Birmingham, Alabama. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_200107 (2)

Detail of the Latino water fountain from: Travis Somerville “Well Division” 2009 Acrylic on vintage porcelain drinking fountains and panels, automotive paint on metal drinking fountain, copper pipes, running water Beta Pictoris/Maus Contemporary, Birmingham, Alabama. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_200055 (2)

Detail of the Native American water fountain from: Travis Somerville “Well Division” 2009 Acrylic on vintage porcelain drinking fountains and panels, automotive paint on metal drinking fountain, copper pipes, running water Beta Pictoris/Maus Contemporary, Birmingham, Alabama. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_195120 (2)

We Are All Imperfect (www.imperfectarticles.com) Trenton Doyle Hancock at Volta NY. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_194439 (2)

Peterson Kamwathi “Untitled (Positions Series Part II, VII) Signed titled and dated 2015 on the reverse Charcoal, stencil, pastel, spray paint, watercolor, ink and collage on paper. Executed in 2015. ARTLabAfrica, Nairobi. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_194426 (2)

Peterson Kamwathi “Untitled (Positions Series Part II, IX) Signed titled and dated 2015 on the reverse Charcoal, stencil, pastel, spray paint, watercolor, ink and collage on paper. Executed in 2015. ARTLabAfrica, Nairobi. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_193909 (2)

Yashua Klos killing it at #Volta2015. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_193901 (2)

Yashua Klos. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_193529 (2)

Kenyatta Hinkle. Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco/New York. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_193527 (2)

Kenyatta Hinkle. Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco/New York. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_193523 (2)

Kenyatta Hinkle. Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco/New York. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_193507 (2)

Kenyatta Hinkle. Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco/New York. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_193455 (2)

Kenyatta Hinkle. Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco/New York. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_193254 (2)

Kenyatta Hinkle “The Transfiguration” 2015 gouache, India ink and acrylic on wood panel. Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco/New York. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_193156 (2)

Kenyatta Hinkle “The Seer” 2015 India ink, polyfilm, acrylic paint on wood panel. Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco/New York. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

20150306_193105 (2)

Kenyatta Hinkle “The Sower” 2015 India ink, acrylic paint and polyfilm on wood panel. Jenkins Johnson Gallery, San Francisco/New York. Photo by Erin K. Hylton

 

Shaping Power: Luba Masterworks from the Royal Museum for Central Africa

Aimé Mpane, Congo, Shadow of the Shadow, 2005, Mixed-media installation, 132 x 209 x 144 in., National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Museum Purchase, 2009-10-1, photo (c) 2013 Museum Associates/LACMA

Aimé Mpane, Congo, Shadow of the Shadow, 2005, Mixed-media installation, 132 x 209 x 144 in., National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Museum Purchase, 2009-10-1, photo (c) 2013 Museum Associates/LACMA

Within my time in Los Angeles I had the pleasure of visiting LACMA (The Los Angeles County Museum of Art) and its new gallery and initiative dedicated to the arts of Africa. Through educational programs and outreach the new initiative will provide audiences of all age levels with the experience of exhibitions and the permanent collection dedicated to the arts of Africa. The new gallery gives a more permanent presence at the Museum for the arts of Africa.

LACMA states on their wall text as you enter the gallery, “Situated next to the Egyptian gallery, this new space will foster [the] understanding of the relationships between sub-Saharan Africa and ancient Egypt as part of the shared continent of Africa, and signals LACMA’s commitment to presenting Africa’s innumerable artistic and cultural legacies”.

20131122_134359

Memory Board (Lukasa), Luba People, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Wood, beads, and metal, 13 3/8 in., Private Collection, photo. 2013. Photo credit: Erin Hylton

The first exhibition of the initiative is entitled “Shaping Power: Luba Masterworks from the Royal Museum for Central Africa”, representing a glimpse of the society which is one of the most important kingdoms in Central Africa. LACMA collaborated with the staff of the Royal Museum for Central Africa, in Teruvren, Belgium, specifically with Anne-Marie Bouttiaux who is the Head of the Ethnography Division and served as co-curator of the exhibition.

20131122_134425

Staff of Office: Kibango. Democratic Republic of the Congo, Luba Peoples, 19th century. Wood, iron, and fiber. Royal Collection for Central Africa. 2013. Photo credit: Erin Hylton.

Within the exhibition you can find a glimpse into the Luba society with emblems from Luba rulers. Not only do you view the arts, you also get a sneak into the underpinnings of authority. One proverb states, “Men are chiefs in the daytime, but women are chiefs at night.” Although Luba arts were made and owned by men, the arts almost always represent women, showing the role women played in their communities and their importance.

20131122_135305

Hermaphrodite Figure. Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kalundwe Peoples, 19th century. Wood, fiber leather, and headed nails. Royal Museum for Central Africa. 2013. Photo credit: Erin Hylton

In addition to historical works, there is an installation entitled Congo: Shadow of the Shadow (2005) by the Luba artist Aimé Mpane, borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art. There is a male figure made from 4,652 match sticks displaying human strength and fragility with light playing against shadow.

20131122_134512

Aimé Mpane, Congo, Shadow of the Shadow, 2005, Mixed-media installation, 132 x 209 x 144 in., National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Museum Purchase, 2009-10-1. 2013. Photo credit: Erin Hylton

20131122_133832

Aimé Mpane, Congo, Shadow of the Shadow, 2005, Mixed-media installation, 132 x 209 x 144 in., National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Museum Purchase, 2009-10-1. 2013. Photo credit: Erin Hylton