Why Do We Need Children’s Museums?

In December I had the incredible experience of traveling to Poland, for “Why Do We Need Children’s Museums?” a two-day conference jumpstarting the conversation around starting a children’s museum in Warsaw. The meeting was organized by the arts organization Artanimacje Association and the Adam Mickiewicz Institute. Six ACM member institutions sent staff to give presentations about their museums: Boston Children’s MuseumBrooklyn Children’s MuseumThe Children’s Museum of IndianapolisLondon Children’s MuseumMUZEIKO – America for Bulgaria, and Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling.

Below please find my excerpt from the ACM blog on my experience:

Erin Hylton, former Education Programs Manager, Brooklyn Children’s Museum, presented, “Programming for Over a Century: Addressing the Needs of Children and their Families since 1899”

The meeting highlight was connecting with colleagues in Warsaw and hearing about the incredible projects they have created for children and young people in Poland. It was inspirational and illuminating to be a part of the beginning stages of the development of a children’s museum in Poland.

It was an incredible opportunity to connect with colleagues from around the world in Poland, as well as hear about the work happening in children’s museums across North America and Europe. The children’s museum field is as diverse as the families and communities we serve through a variety of programs, projects and exhibitions. It was encouraging to hear how we are all working through similar questions and solutions, including teaching empathy to our family and community audiences.

Blog Link for experiences from the other colleagues: https://childrensmuseums.blog/2018/03/21/why-do-we-need-childrens-museums/

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Art Education on the Edge: Josef Albers Inspired Project

Recently I had the pleasure of teaching in a  summer school classroom of 3rd grade students with varying capabilities and interests, such as ADHD (Attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder) and ODD (Oppositional defiant disorder). The ELA (English Language Arts) lesson that was most effective for students across the spectrum involved a hands on art making activity.

The lesson began by reading the book, An Eye for Color: The Story of Josef Albers by Natasha Wing. Students were then invited to create their own Josef Albers inspired compositions. With a pleothera of colors and squares students came up with unique and powerful artworks. Students enjoyed having the time to be creative and were excited to take their work home to show their families!

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Drake: Greenville County Museum of Art

David Drake was an enslaved potter in the 19th century whose incredible craftsmanship and literacy while enslaved rose him to fame upon discovery of his pots in the twenty-first century. Born in the Americas, Dave worked as a turner in pottery manufacturing facilities in South Carolina’s Edgefield District. Although dangerous for slaves to learn to read and write, Dave was literate and expressed his literacy inside his pots. His most famous inscription notes, “I wonder where is all my relation/friendship to all-and, every nation”. Dave’s pots can be found in the collections of many institutions.

On my trip to Greenville, SC I had the honor of viewing his pots at the Greenville County Museum of Art. Below find my shots of the installation that is a part of their permanent collection.

Hands On: Build a Kingdom

On Sunday, August 16th from 2-4pm families are invited to a drop-in workshop inspired by Lauren Halsey’s artwork in the Everything, Everyday exhibition at The Studio Museum in Harlem. As a 2014-15 Artist in Residence Lauren constructed one of her “kingdoms,” built environments that combine contemporary and ancient imagery with materials ranging from crystals and LEDs to lasers, iridescent light and more in the Mezzanine Gallery space. Families are invited to think on how might they build their own kingdom and create their own sculptural creations.

Below are some photographs I took of the installation at The Studio Museum in Harlem

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Close up of Lauren Halsey “Kingdom Splurge” 2015 Paint, foam, cardboard, plaster, joint compound, wood, resin, metal and found objects (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2015.)

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Close up of Lauren Halsey “Kingdom Splurge” 2015 Paint, foam, cardboard, plaster, joint compound, wood, resin, metal and found objects (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2015.)

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Close up of Lauren Halsey “Kingdom Splurge” 2015 Paint, foam, cardboard, plaster, joint compound, wood, resin, metal and found objects (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2015.)

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Close up of Lauren Halsey “Kingdom Splurge” 2015 Paint, foam, cardboard, plaster, joint compound, wood, resin, metal and found objects (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2015.)

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Close up of Lauren Halsey “Kingdom Splurge” 2015 Paint, foam, cardboard, plaster, joint compound, wood, resin, metal and found objects (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2015.)

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Close up of Lauren Halsey “Kingdom Splurge” 2015 Paint, foam, cardboard, plaster, joint compound, wood, resin, metal and found objects (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2015.)