Reflections: Celebrating 50 Years of the West Indian American Day Carnival

Reflections Ann. Images.jpg

As a life long Bronx resident I am elated and proud to have curated an exhibition that celebrates my West Indian heritage. With the support of BXArts Factory and hosted by the Montefiore Fine Arts program ArtViews gallery, the exhibition is on view through early October at Montefiore Moses Campus, 90 East 210th St. Bronx, NY 10467.

The West Indian population of the Bronx, NY is 8% or 106,000 people from various islands lying between southeastern North America and northern South America bordering the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic and comprising the Greater Antilles, Lesser Antilles and Bahamas.  The largest event in New York City that celebrates and honors Caribbean culture, arts, history and traditions is the West Indian American Day Carnival, which is comprised of week-long festivities and a grand finale. The grand finale Carnival reaches over one million people in attendance during Labor Day weekend with participants and tourists from all over the world.

Reflections: Celebrating 50 Years of the West Indian American Day Carnival celebrates and honors the history of the Caribbean carnival by reflecting on the West Indian population in the Bronx, NY and noting their impact and long-lasting influence on their community and NYC. Through the lens of 5 Bronx-based photographers, the vibrancy, tradition and impact of West Indian Americans are captured by the photographs on display. Artists Trevon Blondet, Ijeoma D. Iheanacho, Jonathan Joseph, Omesh Persaud and Harri “Indio” Ramkishun each take on a subtheme of inspiration from the West Indian community. Together the photographs share the energy and strength of the West Indian population and the groups influence to the political, economic and cultural vitality of the North Bronx.

For more information:

https://montefiorefineartprogram.squarespace.com/artviews-gallery-1

Advertisements

St. Michael’s Cathedral

St. Michael’s Cathedral located in Sitka, Alaska is of the Orthodox Church of the Diocese of Alaska. As the earliest Orthodox cathedral in the New World, it was built when Alaska was in control of Russia. Since 1962 it has been a National Historic Landmark. Once you enter the church you immediately notice most of the original collection that had embellished the earlier cathedral such as Our Lady of Sitka. The display cases surrounding the chapel also contain treasures from the original chapel that was destroyed by accidental fire in 1966. Italian Roccocco design can be found on some of the doors, while the silver plated style of the eighteenth and nineteenth century can be seen in the icons of Christ the Savior and the Virgin Mary. It is a stunning experience.

Art at the Bar: BXArts Factory

https-cdn.evbuc.comimages339211841336011974301original

ONE SUNDAY ONLY!!
Don’t miss it!

Sunday, August 13th ONLY!!!
4 to 8 pm

$10 (online only) & $12 (at the door)

Come join us this summer as we have fun with art at the bar. Drink and draw, paint, play, network and have fun! Spend this Sunday afternoon in August in the Bronx with BxArts Factory and Chelsea Craft Brewery! We will have live models to draw, music, contests and many other cool things to do! Bring your sketchbooks and pencils! We will also have some supplies available! Models will pose to be drawn! Plus we will have other games and art stations to keep things fun!

Regarding the Figure: The Studio Museum in Harlem

The Studio Museum in Harlem presents the exhibition Regarding the Figure with work from The Studio Museum in Harlem’s permanent collection. The works in the exhibition showcase the use of portraiture and figuration to reflect personal history and identity as well as representation and responsibility. Open now through August 6th!Barkley L. Hendricks “Lawdy Mama” 1969 (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2017.)

Jordan Casteel “Twins” 2017 Oil on canvas (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2017.)

Henry Taylor “Homage to a Brother” 2007 Acrylic and collage on linen (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2017.)

Wangechi Mutu “Chocolate Nguva” 2015 Bronze (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2017.)

Community Action Day: I Am Present

Image may contain: 1 person, text

Community Action Day: I am Present

May 21, 2017 (3-5pm)

It will be a day to reflect, heal and act in support of our community. This day of action will bring together an amazing group of women artists that, with you, and other community members will bring action and attention to the many cases of missing black and brown girls in the Bronx and adjacent cities. We will use creativity to heal, express ourselves and be present with each other. We will have tables filled with art materials for artists and community members to work together. We will also have a table for children to create.

The Action Day will be videotaped to have an online resource for spreading the message and awareness in regards to our missing girls. Come be part of a collective wall of words and be part of this wonderful thoughtful day.

ABOUT THE EXHIBIT: “Hombres de Arcilla” (Men of Clay) showcases Alberto Villalobos’ collection of 43 hand-made clay masks. These masks honor the memory of the 43 disappeared students from Ayotzinapa, Guerrero, Mexico. About his work, Villalobos says “for me, clay represents the fragility of life, yet the resilience of the human spirit. I hope that by giving faces to the disappeared, their memory may live on.”

Photo Credit: Barbara Reeley Graphic design: Meagan Van Ahn