Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose

Hi-Fructose magazine turned 10 years old this year. At MOCA they marked the 10th anniversary by featuring the works of 51 artists who were featured between its pages. The exhibition entitled Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose features works by artists in a variety of media, such as installation, painting, photography, sculpture and ceramics. Below are a few of my favorists:

Tim Biskup “Asylum #4” 2008 Cel-Vinyl acrylic on wooden panel on view at MOCA Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2016)

Mark Dean Veca “Oh Yeah” 2011 India ink and acrylic on canvas on view at MOCA Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2016)

Wim Delvoye “Cement Truck” 2010 Laser-cut stainless steel on view at MOCA Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2016)

Martin Wittfooth “Incantation” 2014 Oil on canvas on view at MOCA Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2016)

Ron English “Combrat Rising” 2012 Oil on canvas on view at MOCA Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2016)

Harlem Is…Dance

unnamed

Check out “harlem is … DANCE // Special Artist Reception” on Eventbrite!

Date: Monday, August 29, 2016

Location: MIST Harlem

The exhibition celebrates the legacy of dance in Harlem and includes work by over 14 artists and conributors that either work or live in Harlem. The celebration will include lots of exciting components! RSVP info below:

RSVP email: info@communityworksnyc.org

RSVP phone: 212-459-1854

RSVP on Eventbrite here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/harlem-is-dance-special-artist-reception-tickets-26933154791?aff=eandprexshre&ref=eandprexshre

The New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden

The New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden is a transformational experience. It features magnificent rockery that resemble mountains that inspired the poetry and paintings of Confucian, Buddhist and Taoist monks and other scholars. Visitors can explore eight pavilions, a bamboo forest path, waterfalls, a Koi-filled pond, Chinese calligraphy, and a variety of Ghongshi scholar’s rocks including a 15-foot formation that towers over the central courtyard. Snug Harbor partnered with the City of New York, the Landscape Architecture Company of China, the Metropolitan Chinese American Community and hundreds of volunteers to build the Garden, which opened in 1999.

New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2016)

New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2016)

New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2016)

New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2016)

New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2016)

New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2016)

New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden (Photo by Erin K. Hylton 2016)

 

Art Education on the Edge: Josef Albers Inspired Project

Recently I had the pleasure of teaching in a  summer school classroom of 3rd grade students with varying capabilities and interests, such as ADHD (Attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder) and ODD (Oppositional defiant disorder). The ELA (English Language Arts) lesson that was most effective for students across the spectrum involved a hands on art making activity.

The lesson began by reading the book, An Eye for Color: The Story of Josef Albers by Natasha Wing. Students were then invited to create their own Josef Albers inspired compositions. With a pleothera of colors and squares students came up with unique and powerful artworks. Students enjoyed having the time to be creative and were excited to take their work home to show their families!